1856c Museum Quality Indian Army Daguerreotype Handsome Officer Queen Victoria’s Own Corps Of Guides

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1856c Museum Quality Indian Army Daguerreotype Handsome Officer Queen Victoria’s Own Corps Of Guides

$2,495

Indian Army Daguerreotype Officer Queen Victoria’s Own Corps Of Guides

1 in stock

Product Description

PD484: 1856c Important, Museum Quality Indian Army (India’s own as opposed to British regiment in India) 9th Plate Daguerreotype of a Handsome Officer of Queen Victoria’s Own Corps of Guides:

Very nearly pristine condition. Conserved with the electro-platinum wand and archivally resealed with Filmoplast P90. – The Corps of Guides was the most famous of the Indian Army regiments during the period of British rule. They had a reputation for bravery and efficiency that was the envy of all the other units. The North-West Frontier where they operated was rarely quiet and although many of the cavalry and infantry regiments saw frequent action there, none was engaged more than the Guides. The corps was raised in Peshawar by Lieutenant Harry Lumsden in December 1846, comprising one troop of cavalry and two companies of infantry, about 300 men in all. It was the brainchild of Sir Henry Lawrence perhaps inspired by Napoleon’s elite Guides. Recruitment was made easier by offering a higher rate of pay than normal. This attracted a large number of applicants so Lumsden could pick and choose men of high intelligence. One of their first tasks was a peace-keeping role in Lahore some time after the death of Maharajah Ranjit Singh. An effort by the Maharani to seize power was foiled and the Guides escorted her out of the Punjab, a task more dangerous than it sounds as rescue attempts were expected. Please also see PAM89.

Additional Information

Weight 1 kg
Dimensions 1 × 1 × 1 cm