1842 Early Daguerreotype of Rome Santa Cecilia By Joseph Philibert Girault De Prangey

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1842 Early Daguerreotype of Rome Santa Cecilia By Joseph Philibert Girault De Prangey

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Girault De Prangey Daguerreotype for sale.

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Product Description

PD476: 1842 1/3rd Plate Early Daguerreotype of Rome – 78 Via Santa Cecilia By Joseph Philibert Girault De Prangey. Titled and numbered by Prangey’s own hand in ink on a label affixed to verso. Dimensions: 3 ½ x 4 ¾ in.; 9,2 x 11,8 cm. Provenance: Sotheby’s

In the Trastevere district, in Piazza Santa Cecilia at no. 19, in the corner with Via dei Mercanti, there is a building dating back to the Middle Ages and consisting of a rectangular structure embellished laterally by a turret. The painter Ettore Roesler Franz (Rome, 1845-1907), famous for his watercolors collected in his collection entitled “Roma sparita”, in 1882 reproduced the ancient building in a watercolor, which bears the title of “Casa di Fieramosca” .

According to authoritative sources, the building is datable to the second half of the thirteenth century and was property of the Order of the Humiliati, a brotherhood of both sexes dedicated to poverty, who had already stayed in the nearby church of Santa Cecilia in two different periods: on horseback between the ‘300 and the’ 400, and then in the middle of the ‘400 up to half of the’ 500, practicing the art of wool. The Order of the Humiliati was then suppressed in 1571 by Pope Pius V.
The “humiliated” probably lived in this building whose entrance to the ground floor consists of a small portico in Ionic style, later walled up, and reinforced by a side buttress.

The graceful tower, instead, is bounded by a series of hanging arches that runs on one side of the façade. According to a legend, this house was inhabited by the famous Italian condottiere Ettore Fieramosca (Capua, 1476-Valladolid, 1515), who became famous in history for the renowned challenge of Barletta. The story, which dates back to 1503, has been extensively treated and imaginatively told by Piedmontese publicist and politician Massimo Taparelli marchese D’Azeglio (Turin, 1798-1866), in his novel published in 1833 under the title “Ettore Fieramosca o La Challenge of Barletta. “The legend, in fact, wants the captain of fortune, returning from the victory achieved together with Prospero Colonna at the Disfida di Barletta, to stay in this house for about a year. From here he would leave to Spain to lead the traitor Cesare Borgia, who allowed the French to conquer the city of Naples controlled by the same Spanish king Ferdinand of Aragon.

The House of Ettore Fieramosca is private property and can not be visited, but bears witness to a rare example of a well-preserved medieval house in Rome, like a little jewel in the Trastevere district, comparable to the so-called Casa dell’Orso on the homonymous street Dante in Piazza Belli, or even the small village of San Paolo alla Regola.

Additional Information

Weight 1 kg
Dimensions 1 × 1 × 1 cm

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